New reports for TFS Administrators

There are some really nice reports for those of you that are TFS Administrators.

Browse in to your server like this http://your-server:8080/tfs/_oi/

There are two sets of reports, the Activity log and the TFS Job Monitoring

Activity log

This reports shows every single command that every single user has executed against TFS from the last 14 days (the amount of days can be changed).

TFS Job Monitoring

This is a set of reports that show all jobs that are being rund from inside TFS by the TFS Background Job Agent.

Read more in Grant Holidays blog here

TFS or TFS?

Starting with TFS 2012 we are now faced with the options of using either Team Foundation Server or Team Foundation Service as our ALM platform of choice. The big question is which one to choose. One is installed locally while the other is hosted in the cloud. This is an important difference but not the only one. I’ll list the most important points to consider here.

The cloud

If for some reason you are not allowed to handle your work items or source code in the cloud then Team Foundation Service is out of the question as it is based on Microsoft’s Windows Azure platform.

Installation and administration

Installing Team Foundation Server has become much easier than it was back in 2005 but can still be a bit tricky. Using Team Foundation Service is basically a matter of supplying a name for your instance. If you dont want the hassle of server installation and administration then you should consider Team Foundation Service.

Customization

Process templates are not customizable in Team Foundation Service. If you think you will have to make adjustments to the process template (like adding new fields to work items) then you probably want to go with Team Foundation Server instead. Unless you are ready to wait, because this will change in the future.

Document management

If you want solid document management features then Team Foundation Server is the way to go as it includes Sharepoint. Team Foundation Service currently has no document management features. This will change in the future with Office 365 integration (see Brian Harry’s first response in the comments).

Reports

One of the many nice features of Team Foundation Server is all the reports you get out of the box. Apart from sprint burndown charts you get no reports at all in Team Foundation Service. This might be perfectly fine for some or a complete deal breaker for others. This will probably change in the future but I’ve been unable to find anything to support this claim. Windows Azure SQL Reporting is available though so hopefully only a matter of time before it is integrated into the Team Foundation Service offering.

Price tag

There is actually a pricing preview for Visual Studio 2012 (and Team Foundation Server)  but very limited information about Team Foundation Service pricing.

 

There are other differences but this should cover the most important aspects. If you want to dig deeper, have a look at the Team Founation Service whitepaper.

Test steps and results in TFS 2010

All SSRS reports you get out of the box with TFS 2010 are trend reports and they don’t show any details. I was recently asked to build a custom report listing all test cases in a test plan and for each test case every step should be listed with action, expected result ant test outcome. Basically the same kind of info you can get for a single test case when you view the test results in Microsoft Test Manager 2010. This turned out to be quite a bit trickier than expected but after getting some much needed info from a developer at Microsoft (thank you Sriram) I was able to get it all together.

Getting test steps and results from Tfs_DefaultCollection

Test steps are stored as XML and are found in table WorkItemLongTexts. You can use this query to get them.

declare @fldIdSteps int = (Select top 1 fldid from Fields where ReferenceName = ‘Microsoft.VSTS.TCM.Steps’)      select * from WorkItemLongTexts where FldID = @fldIdSteps

Test results for each step are found in table tbl_TestActionResult. You can use this query to get them.

select * from tbl_TestActionResult

Now, you’ll notice there are a couple of issues popping up. You’ll need to join a XML result with a table result, there might be several revisions of the test steps and there are probably many results saved for each and every test case. But most of all, there is no obvious way to link steps to results. Every test step has an ID but tbl_TestActionResult does not contain a “test step ID” column.

ActionPath explained

This is where the column ActionPath in tbl_TestActionResult comes in. This column will typically contain an empty string, 8 chars string or 16 chars string. For a specific test result in a test run there will be one line with the empty string (this line is the over all test result) and then one line for each step, containing 8 or 16 chars. These ActionPath chars are hierarchical hexadecimal representations of test step ids. The first 8 chars is the step id and the next 8 chars (if they exist) is a shared step id.

And now you have the knowledge needed to pair up test results with corresponding test steps!

Some issues to consider…

There are a few more issues you’ll have to tackle as well.

  • Step ID != Sequence number. The test step id is not the same as the numbers you see when viewing a test case in a GUI. The numbers you see in the GUI are generated in the GUI to clarify the step sequence. The step id is never shown and the sequence number is not stored in the database. You’ll have to rely on the order of the <step> elements in the XML to figure out the step sequence.
  • Revisions and result. There can be several revisions of the test steps stored in table WorkItemLongTexts and there can be several test results stored for each revision. You’ll have to compare timestamps for revisions and results when joining them to avoid errors.
  • Performance. The Database Tfs_DefaultCollection is the production database and you should always take performance hits into consideration before deploying reports that read directly from your production database.

More details

When I first tried to figure out how this all worked I put a question up at the MSDN forums. For SQL and code samples you can go to my post on MSDN and get some more details.